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britboy
Posted 13 Dec 2010
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Posts: 133

britboy

just to take your minds off the frozen grounds and look forward to the expected glorius summer expected in the uk, i would just like to hear your thoughts on how you renovate a wicket after it is taken out of play -crease to crease(,not the end repairs as im sure we know about that bit)
Do you use a sarrell roller after soaking or a groundsman spiker with micro tines perhaps,then overseed-do you dress in a small amount of loam with this and do you fertilise after.This is for club wickets by the way that would have to be used again in the second half of the season maybe 6-8 weeks later-great to hear what you people do and what has been good for you.
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GRG
Posted 13 Dec 2010
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ebony, once the wicket has been brushed up clean i soak it, hopefully to a depth of at least 25mm to 50mm, let the excess dry off and then i usually use the Groundsman spiker with cluster heads. Spike the pitch two or three times, overseed, fertilise, apply a couple of bags of loam and drag brush in. Water again and cover with flat sheet or germination sheet.
Occassionally i will use the graden to a shallow depth, and then carry out repair as before.
Both have been good. No real preference either way. Just go with gut feeling. First method may be preferable if only because of the watering to a depth before hand.
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britboy
Posted 13 Dec 2010
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Posts: 133

britboy

hi bath,i have a 345 groundsman with the cluster heads but it is one of the originals with the treaded tyres.I am a little concerned that the weight of the machine pressing on the tyres may cause indentation tram lines down the pitch if it is soft after soaking-any thoughts?
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britboy
Posted 13 Dec 2010
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britboy

also,what depth with the cluster heads and when would you choose to graden and to what depth/-i would be a little concerned using the graden as it might leave lines that would open up to cracks maybe in a dry summer?
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barry glynn
Posted 13 Dec 2010
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What do I do? I just cut the grass.

I'd love to be able to renovate early season tracks. However, personally I find it impossible during the season due to 2 things. One is the lack of any equipment suitable to create a decent seed bed over the pitch length. Secondly, it is impossible to have any worthwhile time without senior or colts cricket running all over track.
I repair the ends each week as best I can and try covering them up but in this day and age , am not allowed to keep even them down whilst play is on.
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Aintgottaclue!!
Posted 13 Dec 2010
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Posts: 355

I may cut grass, but i'm not green !!

Barry, why cant you keep germination sheets on 'in this day and age'?
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GRG
Posted 13 Dec 2010
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ebony, use cluster heads to approx 12/13mm depth. If the surface is that wet it leaves the tyre tread pattern then the surface is still to wet and needs to dry. However, a slight pattern show is not going to hurt. I use a tractor mounted machine sometimes. Tyre tread never creates a problem.
Using a graden to 2/3mm has never caused a problem either. If the pitch is actually played out and not needed again i will often scarify to 10/12 mm and repair. Will not matter if it does crack later.
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britboy
Posted 13 Dec 2010
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Posts: 133

britboy

thanks guys so far- i use the infamous kaloam which tends to be pretty sticky when wet-ok to dress in a couple of bags per pitch after spiking into holes with the seed then lute in ?
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Magnum
Posted 13 Dec 2010
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Tony

Aintgottaclue,

I am with Barry on this one. When you have 5/6 games a week on the square you can't keep the germination sheets down as it is a h&s danger. Also, a point Barry didn't mention. Ideally for renovation work you want to keep the seed moist, having games all week playing over the "damp" tracks tends to wreck any repairs you have made. I intend to experiment with short lengths of "coconut" matting this year and see if I can keep these down longer than conventional germination sheets.
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barry glynn
Posted 13 Dec 2010
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What do I do? I just cut the grass.

Exactly Magnum.
If there was not cricket going on virtually every day, I would like to go down the route that Bath mentions with cluster tines on a Groundsman spiker. trouble is, I aint got one!

I do have a spiker reel for my old Autorake which is absolutely effing useless.
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sweeneytodd
Posted 13 Dec 2010
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i have at least 1 game per day,sometimes 2 games in the height of summer,and always leave germination sheets over repaired pitch ends.I use mushroom pegs to pin them down,pressed firmly into the surface so theyre flush.The sheets are pulled nice and taught with no creases/folds.Ive never had any problems,with studs going through the sheets without any hazards.
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barry glynn
Posted 13 Dec 2010
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What do I do? I just cut the grass.

Sweeny
We are not talking about ends we are talking about complete pitches
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Andy Matthews
Posted 13 Dec 2010
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Posts: 1024

barry there is a lot of hysteria over playing with germination sheets on, I have played first and second team games with sheets on the full length of the pitch, like sweeneytodd they are pulled very tight with lots of pegs, knocked down flush. Germination sheets also provide a lot lower profile than coconut matting. I would also point out that there was a test match played at Edgebaston, I think it was 2008 and after heavy rain they played with 2 pitches covered with full length sheets.
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Willard
Posted 14 Dec 2010
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Always Looking For New Ideas

Germination sheets make such a difference any time of year. Do you find the rye grass strong enough to play on if sown in June or July.

In NZ, any rye grass sown after October is a complete waste of time in Auckland...
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barry glynn
Posted 14 Dec 2010
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What do I do? I just cut the grass.

Andy, you are preaching to the converted. But the umpires , captains are the problem.
Also s test ground doesn't have 10 year kids running all over their square
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trubs
Posted 14 Dec 2010
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Posts: 387

Barry - I still don't understand why you don't get decent results from your rolaspike attachment? Have you tried weighting the front of the machine? I use a tractor weight and can get a good seedbed. Does have to be in the perfect 'plastacine' state though.
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barry glynn
Posted 14 Dec 2010
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What do I do? I just cut the grass.

trubs
Its a crap design. The wheels close half the holes up and then you are walking over the holes as well.Dont know what you mean by weighting the front of the machine though. Its only 4hp isnt it?
I wish I could get it to work.
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has 2 mow
Posted 15 Dec 2010
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its just one life live it

PICT0010
Barry

Sometimes you have to be creative with machines and slightly tweak them to do what you want.

I own a blec uniseeder and it is a good machine, it is rather heavy at 225 kg, it still only drops seed on the surface and the brush then allows some of the seed into the holes, but not all.

I have in the past adapted what you are trying to use with good results, a rear brush can be easily fitted, as is changing the grass box so i can throw in a bag of feed to add penetration, and the bigger box comes in handy at renovation time, and i also add cable ties to the scarifier head so it cleans up better.

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barry glynn
Posted 15 Dec 2010
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What do I do? I just cut the grass.

has 2 mow
Sorry for being thick but I dont understand what you are saying.
Rear brush? Fitted where and for what?and what brush are we talking about?
Cable ties to the scarifying head? Where?
I have no idea what that all means, sorry.
How does that overcome the spike holes being closed up by the wheels and your feet? If you have the surface soft enough ( ie plasticine like) for the spiker reel to make holes, the wheels and your feet just close them up.
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has 2 mow
Posted 15 Dec 2010
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its just one life live it

PICT0001

Cable ties fit between the blades round the rubber spacers, the thicker the better, these i just fitted for an example, the cable ties act like a fan for better clearance of surface, great when you verticut with 1mm blades and a grass box( original or not)

Tip was passed to me by an old contractor and rep.
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barry glynn
Posted 15 Dec 2010
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What do I do? I just cut the grass.

Ok re the scarifier and cable ties but wouldnt fancy bits of the ties coming out on the square for the mower to mangle up on.But still dont see how the rest helps making the spiker reel work better. The only pedestrian seed hole maker that makes any sense to me is the Blec one that you can stand on.What you need is a reverse lever so you could walk backwards!
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has 2 mow
Posted 15 Dec 2010
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its just one life live it

PICT0007

Barry

never had a problem with ties and mowers even after 50,000 sq mtr, and i also would not use a good mower to finish clearing up after doing the scarification work

IF you look at the blec uniseeder at 5k you will find that the wheels travel over your previous holes as does your feet do.

If i was overseeding your ends in the spring, i would broadcast the seed over the area needed, then run up and down with the rolaspike, the only thing to add is a brush mounted to the rear of the machine to help sweep some of the seed into the holes, if your feet or wheels close up some of the holes fine they have seed in them, and mother nature will do the rest.

As for the brush you can use an old broom head, and a makeshift carrier, i will try to find an old photo of mine.
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mario
Posted 15 Dec 2010 Last edited: 15 Dec 2010
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Posts: 1978

I know no boundaries.

DSC 0068
I've seen the cable tie idea on the shafts before. Never tried it myself so can't comment on the improvement on quality of clean-up.

Going back to your main point - I had a try of a Rotorake fitted with the sarrel roller reel whilst instructing at an IOG course (as pictured).

On the day, the ground was soft enough to make passes with the machine and I noticed too that the amount of holes made wasn't nearly enough for seed application, in my opinion, without doing umpteen passes...... and the holes closed up as you walked on them.

Good tool for uncapping/unsealing the surface to allow fertiliser etc., easier ingress to the soil profile. Not sure how economical this reel is to create a seedbed.
I believe that it isn't all that cheap either.

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barry glynn
Posted 15 Dec 2010
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What do I do? I just cut the grass.

I was talking about the Blec cp42 which has a standplate on the back and doesnt work like the one you have pictured.
http://www.akromultihire.co.uk/product.php?prodID=2508
I dont use a mower to clear up after scarification now as I intend to hire the sisis 600 again even though it broke down again! Not interested in the graden again cos you cant box it.
Mother nature doesnt seem to work with seed left on the top but the birds do work!
An old broom head! I aint that practical mate!!!
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GRG
Posted 15 Dec 2010
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Ref your cable ties has to mow, good cheap idea. I still have a scarifer reel where sisis had brushes fitted to the rubber spacers.
Is there a seeder out there that gives enough holes in one pass but does not have the wheels your size tens closing up the holes. I often use the sisis vari seeder on the back of the tractor. I rarely find one pass leaves enough holes so i do many passes. Sometimes i do a pass and over seed, then i do another, overseed again and so on till i am happy. More than one way to skin a cat.
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barry glynn
Posted 15 Dec 2010
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What do I do? I just cut the grass.

The CP42 is the only pedestrian one I can find.
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mario
Posted 15 Dec 2010
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Posts: 1978

I know no boundaries.

DSC 0118
Like you Gordon, with the Variseeder, I do a couple of "dry" runs then load the seed in and do as many as required. But as we know this is tractor-mounted not a pedestrian which Barry is alluding to.
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has 2 mow
Posted 15 Dec 2010
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its just one life live it

With the variseeder do you tow behind a dragmat or dragbrush to get as much seed from the surface into the holes?





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mario
Posted 15 Dec 2010
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Posts: 1978

I know no boundaries.

Yes, I would normally follow up with a dragbrush on the last pass.
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barry glynn
Posted 16 Dec 2010
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What do I do? I just cut the grass.

Mario
The reel costs over £500 and is sold as a spiking reel for seeding purposes. It is absolutely useless for the purpose they sell it for.
Boogering bout putting different boxes on the front so you can load it up with extra weight and fitting bl00dy brooms on the rear instead of a roller is quite frankly a nonsense in my book. It should be able to do the job they sell it for and it cant. Its a pile of sh!te.
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jlawrence
Posted 16 Dec 2010
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Of course there's no bounce, bend your back and put some bloody effort in.

I soak the track a couple of times, run the sorrel over numerous times to create loads of holes, broadcast seed, broadcast a couple of bags of loam then brush it all in.
I'll water it most days and if necessary put a sheet over it.

I'll leave germination sheets on the ends (after seriously flooding them) but don't for the full length. If the players and umpires have a problem with sheets on the ends then tough.
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barry glynn
Posted 17 Dec 2010
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What do I do? I just cut the grass.

Not a question of being just too bad for the umpires, they just wont have it for 1st X1 games.
Neither will the captain but they will of course moan if ends etc look bare.
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mario
Posted 17 Dec 2010
Saltire.gif
Posts: 1978

I know no boundaries.

On ocassion I will have an up and coming 4 day match with two ODI's following on straight after. So I will have two pitches under full length coconut mats.

I've seen the day where I've had as well as two under mats a third which is under a full length germination sheet which is also being protected by a coconut.

If the players want good pitches, then there has to be a consequence!!
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barry glynn
Posted 17 Dec 2010
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What do I do? I just cut the grass.

Dont bring common sense into it!
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BAS
Posted 17 Dec 2010
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Sorry to come off the subject a bit.l currently use six feet wide coconut matting,after searching the web can't really find anything ten ft wide and still manageable weight wise.seen the green coconut matting sold by jms but still only six ft wide when l am looking for ten. Have heard of groundsman using germination sheets ,but would have thought that to be quite dangerous even if fully pegged down.
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jlawrence
Posted 17 Dec 2010
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Of course there's no bounce, bend your back and put some bloody effort in.

I don't have sheets down at all for 1st team matches - it's normally the 1st team tracks I want to protect during the week and it's not like I often have more important matches than theirs.
Never had a problem with umpires/captains complaining about bare ends - so long as they've been repaired and are level no problems.
Common sense and sportsmen in general don't go together when it comes to the playing surfaces.
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barry glynn
Posted 17 Dec 2010
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What do I do? I just cut the grass.

Captains and committee, not umpires, like you say, as long as they are flat, umps are ok with that.
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