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Minormorris64
Posted 21 Dec 2010
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What goes around, comes around

126156
............roller in action on the Boxing Day Wicket ?
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barry glynn
Posted 21 Dec 2010
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What do I do? I just cut the grass.

Its a big ol boy eh for that type eh?
Guesses? Ill say about a ton plus a bit?
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mario
Posted 21 Dec 2010
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I know no boundaries.

With a built-in fire extinguisher by the looks of it. On top of Health and Safety?
So why is the operator not wearing ear protection? Oh wait a minute - perhaps the pair of ear defenders hanging from the frame is the Aussie equivalent of fluffy dice and the operator has ear plugs in. LOL.
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paul kelsey
Posted 21 Dec 2010
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It i'll vibrate up to 3 ton
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Sumomosr
Posted 21 Dec 2010 Last edited: 21 Dec 2010
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GOGGA

Mentay Hydraglide
It i'll vibrate up to 3 ton

Incorrect.
It has no 'vibration' feature.


This is a Mentay Hydraglide - Made in Oz.
Tare weight of 500Kg.
Ballastable with Water (1.2T), Sand (1.5T) or Concrete (2.2T).

Comes with a sunshade feature.
Easy to steer due to the long handles and is very smooth in operation. Hydraulic flow control makes speed adjustment infinately variable and it can go verrry slow if necessary. Large diameter drum (900mm) reduces bow-wave effect further.
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paul kelsey
Posted 21 Dec 2010
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lol @ sumo
vibrator will come on when our batters walk out after last test
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mario
Posted 21 Dec 2010
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I know no boundaries.

Yeah - mines has a sunshade feature too, it's called a woolly hat!!
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Sumomosr
Posted 21 Dec 2010
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GOGGA

So your 'heater' has a brim Kenny?
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wicketdevil
Posted 21 Dec 2010
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Can you just is the longest sentence in the world !!!!!!!

so is that normal aussie practice rolling at an angle then. Ian
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Sumomosr
Posted 21 Dec 2010
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GOGGA

No. He's steering it across to line up for the next pass by leaning his weight on his left hip against the left handle using left hand as a pad.
These turn really easily.
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mackay
Posted 21 Dec 2010
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I love that roller! It would be ideal for many squares in the UK. 1.2 tonnes is plenty for one drum and check out the drum diameter - far better than anything we have over here.
Where can I get one?
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mario
Posted 21 Dec 2010
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I know no boundaries.

Well it might be ok for you young bucks walking up and down....think I'll stick with my ride-on Autoroller.

Pass me my pipe and slippers, please!
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Sumomosr
Posted 21 Dec 2010 Last edited: 21 Dec 2010
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GOGGA

"Where can I get one?"
Ermm... From Australia Andy.

MENTAY Rollers Oz.

Ride-on's made also Ken.
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Grassman2011
Posted 21 Dec 2010
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Andy, my thoughts also. Perhaps we should sit down and design our own. Should be plenty out there willing to build it.
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mario
Posted 21 Dec 2010
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I know no boundaries.

Have you had a look at the Mentay website, Gordon? Some interesting kit.

But what is a Turf Crusher?
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Chris Thornton
Posted 21 Dec 2010
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He not busy being born is busy dying!!

Mine has a sunshine feature too "Mario" it's called CLOUDS!!!
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Grassman2011
Posted 21 Dec 2010
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Having just looked at the site Kenny, i reckon the turf crusher is for breaking/crushing the high clay content soil they use, into a usable crumb. Or were you pulling my leg and asking the obvious ?
You are right though, some interesting bits of kit. Got my mind working overtime now.
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mackay
Posted 21 Dec 2010
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Thanks for that Sumo! Shame that Mentay haven't had the foresight to export them.
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Grassman2011
Posted 21 Dec 2010
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At approx £17000 Andy nobody would buy one, would they ?
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mackay
Posted 21 Dec 2010
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BLOODY HELL!!!!!!!!!! £17000 for what? Scrap previous post, I'm going to start making them and exporting to Aus!!!!!!
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platinum
Posted 22 Dec 2010
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yeah turf crusher for getting wicket soil into usebale gear for the wicket........he is diagonally rolling.....they do export...excellent gear....alot of clubs in australia have the mentay 2000......u will see later in the week if they take more photos curator will be on the mentay 2000
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eddyinfreehold
Posted 22 Dec 2010
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I agree with wicketdevil...he's turning that on a length, strange practice. Why not run on and turn off the 'square' if it's that easy or just engage reverse?

Lovely roller though. I like the 'pilot' rollers too. Anyone who's ever used a pedestrian Bomag will know why. At a club down the road they have a roller of similar diameter but twice as wide and hollow. It takes four to operate (no motor) and comes in around 1.5 tons. It is so big it produces a truly beautiful flat square without overcrushing.

I like the sheet cover pegs too. Nice and big and painted yellow. No chance of running over one of them then.
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eddyinfreehold
Posted 22 Dec 2010
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Looking at their website, I want a Mentay Hydraride when I grow up. Anything that comes with rear view mirrors, a bench seat to fit half the team on and an Esky above the drivers head gets my vote. Plus it looks beautiful in a kind of 'End of Empire' way.
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A J
Posted 22 Dec 2010 Last edited: 22 Dec 2010
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flintstones car[1]

- Mentay Hydraride -

Yes, thought it looked familier?

wouldn`t say no to one,but after it`s been pimped up a bit? paint job would have to go for a start. Surprised JD haven`t tried to badge it? And that gear stick thingy! what`s that all about. looks like a handbag holder or something for wilma!!.
Looks like somebodys been watching too many fredi flintstone cartoons?

Apart from that, i`ll get our best M&S mince pies out and hope.....
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Willard
Posted 24 Dec 2010
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Superb roller. I have one ballasted with concrete. About 2 tonne.

Consider the useless auto roller 4ft, it's far too wide for decent compaction, and the weight is spread over two drums.

The mentay does the trick, but you have to walk behind it!
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Barry Big Shot
Posted 24 Dec 2010
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Once a muppet.....................

"Useless auto roller".
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platinum
Posted 24 Dec 2010
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melbourne cricket ground pitch mcg groundsman 2543332
if thats not diagonal rolling im not a curator.
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paul kelsey
Posted 24 Dec 2010
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UL if Autorollers are useless whats that make my Aveling,
remember one as big as that filled with concrete but it had handles at both ends and took eight people to roll the wicket. Its a bit like USA down under everythings bigger and better.
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barry glynn
Posted 24 Dec 2010
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What do I do? I just cut the grass.

Yes of course Vic the Autoroller is useless, its made in the UK and used on "useless" English "blocks".
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Barry Big Shot
Posted 24 Dec 2010
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Once a muppet.....................

Forgot Barry to add by blokes from Guildford.
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pacman75cricket
Posted 24 Dec 2010
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No offence but am i not right in thinking auto roller drum has smaller diameter drum(greater footprint)

Mine filled with water to ballast weight as required giving better flexibilty.

Must be doing things wrong
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barry glynn
Posted 24 Dec 2010
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What do I do? I just cut the grass.

Pacman
Yes you are doing things wrong according to the omnipotent one from down under.
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pacman75cricket
Posted 24 Dec 2010
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Thought so just need some of that 70% clay just right for those april games may have to start bowling again
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mackay
Posted 24 Dec 2010
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The Cranfield rolling trials demonstrated that the ideal drum diameter for English soils is 1 metre or more.

The Autoroller has a drum diameter of 0.6m.

In my opinion, the Aveling Barford rollers are better suited to our needs and the fact that the front and rear drums are not aligned makes no difference. (I accept that the aren't the best to use, however).

My preference is currently for a 120 road roller, such as a Bomag (Ammann are even better but harder to find).

For achieving greatest compaction on English soils, it was demonstrated that a roller of c.6T is best, however, there is rather more to producing a good wicket than just achieving massive compaction.

I'd like to see Autoroller and others respond to the extensive research by changing their design and making a roller that is better suited to cricket.

.....bet they don't though!
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barry glynn
Posted 24 Dec 2010
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What do I do? I just cut the grass.

Well if that is correct about the diameter both autoroller and Poweroll have got it wrong.
Mind you, having decent weather and the ability to control the dryness of your square must play an important part as well?
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mackay
Posted 25 Dec 2010 Last edited: 25 Dec 2010
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Yes, the drying of the soil is essential for bulk density (compaction in the soil) to reach optimum levels. A nice summation of the reseach is avaliable at

http://static.ecb.co.uk/files/guidelines-for-rolling-in-cricket-10409.pdf

It amazes me that so many groundsman talk about (and often poo-poo) the trials but have not properly read the research.

It's not that Autoroller or Powerroll have got anything wrong, but rather that we now know that a larger drum diameter will mean greater downward force, and appreciably less forward movement of the soil (we knew this before, but it wasn't demonstrated so well). Not so vital in squares which don't have soil fractures or the potential for root shear/break, but vitally important in a lot of older squares. Indeed, there is a strong case to suggest that smaller diameter rollers may actually help cause soil fractures at the 25- 35mm zone.
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barry glynn
Posted 25 Dec 2010
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What do I do? I just cut the grass.

If that is so then re the diameter, could there be a case for the rolling speed having to be varied if you are using such a roller as a Poweroll with a smaller diameter? I mean the Cranfield report recommends a rolling speed I think of about 2 mins a pass doesn't it?
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Willard
Posted 25 Dec 2010
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A 1 metre diameter would be preferable, but the autoroller's main downfall is it's width.

The narrower 3 foot model has a better foot print. Obviously single drum rollers like the mentay will do more, but if a single drum is also too wide, the effect is negative.

A metre wide & metre diameter works wonders. More so if filled with concrete. I would suggest water ballasting for English blocks though...
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pacman75cricket
Posted 25 Dec 2010
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Was considering the benefit of a single drum roller re amount of passes if it would give greter control than a twin drum roller
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mackay
Posted 26 Dec 2010
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Re. speed: The Cranfield report examined rolling speed in relation to consolidation (ie forcing water out of the soil with the weight) found that it is not practically possible to do this while rolling. It did not examine the effect of the 'bow wave' at different speeds (or if it did I've skipped over that bit (appologies). I've always felt that going quicker giver the roller less chance to dig in and hence leads to less forward pressure on the soil, however, this is pure conjecture on my part. I would imagine that going quicker with a smaller diameter roller would be of benefit, but weather that is in any way significant I have no idea.

When pre-season rolling, I always start off going quickly with each new weight of roller and then slow it down gradually with each pass. I'd be interested to hear if I was actually achieving anything by doing this.

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barry glynn
Posted 26 Dec 2010
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What do I do? I just cut the grass.

re - Speed
Well to me, if I was to leave the roller or any weight, in the same place for an hour, I think it would leave more of a compression compared to if I was to leave the same weight in the same place for half the time. Therefore, if I go slower, I would have thought the compaction would be greater.
I too go faster in the early stages of PSR for the same reason.
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mackay
Posted 26 Dec 2010
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That's the difference between consolidation and compaction, but it was found to be not possible to achieve consolidation when rolling. It was also found that in terms of amount of consolidation achieved when rolling at different (slow speeds) there was no appreciable difference, hence recomendation for rolling at a sensible place.
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Grassman2011
Posted 26 Dec 2010
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At the end of the day it is what works for you with the equipment you have at your disposal.
However, i believe there to be two or three major findings to be considered.
Condition of ground is paramount. If you only have a very heavy roller, then the soil profile has to be far drier to start rolling than if you only have a very light one. My mind tells me that if the roller i am using is leaving any sort of ridge in the surface then it is to heavy for the soil conditions at that time. I do not have the report to hand at the mo, but i seem to remember a moisture figure of around 22% being the ideal for rolling. To many, 22% would appear to be almost dry, so any real moisture present would be considered less than ideal.
We do not have to roll the square to death to achieve maximum compaction. In ideal conditions, the report suggests no more than 22 passes are required for maximum compaction to be achieved. If conditions are less than ideal, then dont roll. I accept that there may be the odd situation where this figure may be adjusted slightly.
The optimum rolling speed has been worked out to be about 1/2 a mile an hour. This equates to taking approx 2 minutes from one wicket line to clearing the wicket line at the other end.
Wicket prep only requires approx ten passes during the 10 to 14 day prep period. Any more than four passes at any one time we are told is pointless.
Possibly the most obvious piece of information to hit us, but usually the hardest to implement and judge, was the drying of the wicket. Drying coupled with managed rolling creates the hardness.
The report also suggested that the bigger the diameter of roller, approx one meter, the greater the compaction achieved.
All very good to read and poo hoo. However, i have certainly carried out much less rolling than in the past and paid more attention to managing the drying process and achieved very good results.
Always remember, listen to advice, try it, see if it works. Nothing ventured nothing gained, but in the end, it is what works for you.
Happy New Year all.
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barry glynn
Posted 26 Dec 2010
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What do I do? I just cut the grass.

Bath,that all makes sense to me. I would prefer to have roll ons to use for control of the elements instead of a flat sheet though, hopefully next season. But I try and keep much to what the reort said in terms of speed and number of passes. Also I think and this is obvious I suppose but just consistent rolling up and down same line as accurately as possible can improve ones pitches. Previously I had seen a contractor leaving the rolling to casual labour who either didn't know, didn't care or both regarding proper rolling proceedure.
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Barry Big Shot
Posted 27 Dec 2010
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Once a muppet.....................

Mate is currently using a 7T roller for a game in a few days time. Will be interesting to see results.
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Willard
Posted 27 Dec 2010
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Moisture content & drying is very important, but that doesn't take away that the 4ft auto roller is too wide. If you fully ballast the 4ft & 3ft models then use them on the same block. You will achieve better compaction with the 3ft model.

It's the same with a single drum roller, i've got a big **** off 5ft single drum & it's useless. Whereas the compact 1 metre wide mentay does a great job...
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wickerman
Posted 27 Dec 2010 Last edited: 27 Dec 2010
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imagesCAL03VMF
i agree with Bath. timing and quality is critical.

i have to use a 3 drum roller like in the picture. i know its not ideal (clubs finances etc), but as long as i roll at the right time, at the right speed and for the right time, it leaves no tram lines and over compaction is never a problem

i roll very slowly with four passes on each strip max each day. the tracks have always been hard, bouncy and consistant. when i've been away on business (im a volunteer groundsman) and other players have to muck in, they kill the wicket by either over rolling or just rolling at the wrong time.

groundsman with experience on his wicket just knows when to roll/water/cut etc. others don't (in my opinion).


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barry glynn
Posted 27 Dec 2010
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What do I do? I just cut the grass.

Alistair
I used to have one that was like that but about 50 years older. It was a nightmare to start, you needed instructions from Fred Dibley.
And the fumes were a killer, had to roll with a mask on!
Mind you, if the stuff about height of roller and footprint etc are true, maybe they are better but I know which I prefer to use.
What you say about knowing your square is crucial I think.
I do not know one single cricketer at our club who does not think that rolling for longer and longer is not a good idea. How many times have you been asked/told after a pitch has not played that well in terms of bounce and pace that it "just hadnt been rolled enough"? The fact that it had been rolling for 2 weeks and was about 12 degrees C, never seems to come into their reckoning eh?
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wickerman
Posted 27 Dec 2010 Last edited: 27 Dec 2010
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hi barry,

my clubs roller is very similar to the one in the picture and is 34 years old (according to the certificate stamped on the side). its 5ton and a bitch to start. the electric wiring is failing and it often takes me 5 mins of swearing and threatening before it starts.

it does a great job though, if used properly. as you've stated, most players think that more rolling is better. over a pint at the bar i try and explain the processes i follow to prepare a wicket and they take the p*ss by falling alseep. swines! but the match in question was early in the season. the guys did a great job in helping while i was away but ignored my instructions. they shaved the wicket, didn't water enough and rolled and rolled and rolled. the result was a shin high dust bowl. afterwards that track had small chunks of clay soil breaking off the surface and was a totally different colour for the rest of the season.
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barry glynn
Posted 27 Dec 2010
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What do I do? I just cut the grass.

Hi Alistair

Went through a similar thing myself 2 years ago when I had the temerity to go on holiday for a week in September after the league season finished.
Despite my written instructions, they rolled the pitch 3 times longer than I told them to. It went along the floor,

Its also true that when , very occasionally, one of them asks me a question about pitch preparation etc and I start to tell them, they get bored within 30 seconds.

Until I got a grant and obtained my Poweroller, I had an old TW White autoroller that is a crank start and I often almost reached heart failure starting it.
But 5ton!! Blimey!
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EDDIE G
Posted 27 Dec 2010
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Barry and Co. With all this talk of roller drum size, width and weight. have you or fellow groundsmen who use the poweroll or auto roll after using a large drummed roller noticed any difference in the wickets you produce, because I had a new 4' poweroll at the beginning of last season and found no difference in my wickets. What I have not changed is my preseason rolling and I still roll the same as I have always done 34" atco mower increasing the weight steadily and finish off with the poweroll close to the season starting. If the theory is correct are poweroll and others going to redesign there rollers and are county grounds going to change there rollers.
Eddie.
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barry glynn
Posted 27 Dec 2010
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What do I do? I just cut the grass.

Eddie
I got my 4foot Poweroll in mid season 2010. To be perfectly honest, I didnt see any difference in the pitches.
As soon as I got it, I ballasted it up to its full weight of about 2.1 tonnes or so. Until then I was using a 3ft TW White autoroller of about 1.4 tonnes.
But, it takes a bit less time and is a hell of a lot easier to use.
My psr has normally consisted of usinng the old roller , fast to begin with and then slower as time went by. Maybe not perfect but the biggest cylinder mower I have is a 24inch.

This coming psr I will be using the Poweroll , unballasted and quicker to begin with and then slow it down as before as the psr progresses.

I dont envisage ballasting it up until late April depending on the weather.
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Grassman2011
Posted 27 Dec 2010
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Barry, i think the report also suggests getting the heaviest wieght on as soon as the ground conditions allow. Nothing gained by rolling faster and then slowing down, or using a lighter roller longer.
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mario
Posted 27 Dec 2010
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I know no boundaries.

Weighed myself today and have gained a stone since the end of the season.

Does this mean that I'll get my PSR done quicker!!!!
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mackay
Posted 27 Dec 2010
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Report definately recomends gradually increasing weight and (crucially) allowing drying time. It specifically mentions that cricket soils in spring have softened in the top few inches and that going straight on with a heavy roller can mean that they will 'drop' by 10mm or more - this would be pretty disasterous for roots and could potentially cause a compaction pann/ soil break.
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Mike
Posted 27 Dec 2010 Last edited: 27 Dec 2010
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This thread reminds me of a conversation I had about psr with a former colleague... I was told to undertake our psr with our Tri-king

Needless to say, that didn't happen!
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Grassman2011
Posted 28 Dec 2010
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Absolutely right Andy. Drying time and right ground conditions are paramount.
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jlawrence
Posted 28 Dec 2010
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Of course there's no bounce, bend your back and put some bloody effort in.

Willard, could you please explain what the width of the roller has to do with anything. It doesn't. It's the downward force imparted through the contact area that is important.
If you've got a 1.5T 3ft roller and a 2T 4ft roller then it is highly possible that the downward force is exactly the same. Which iirc is the situation with the autoroller & poweroll.
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panch
Posted 28 Dec 2010
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Mantays flagship roller is 6 foot wide. Anyway i think you are all splitting hairs, a foot here or half a ton there will make very little difference on compaction/consolidation, I havent got a degree in engineering so hopefully AA or someone similar is still using this site and can help my explanation.
to get a significant increase in compaction/consolidation you will need to increase the weight exponentionaly for example to consolidate your pitch an inch further you may need to double your weight and then the next inch will need double the weight again.
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Grassman2011
Posted 28 Dec 2010
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That is why in road construction they use the vibrating rollers Panch.
As you say, splitting hairs. You can only achieve the best you can with what you have available.
I believe the report mentioned that increasing the weight of roller up to six ton made very little difference to using 2.5 to 3 tons. I know cases where three to four tons has/is used and they would swear buy it.
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mackay
Posted 28 Dec 2010
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It's all there in the report. Cut and paste the below (it will take about 20 mins max to read and digest):


http://static.ecb.co.uk/files/guidelines-for-rolling-in-cricket-10409.pdf



Increasing the weight of the roller (keeping the drum width and diameter constant) certainly does increase the compactive potential.

There is a massive difference between 1.5 tonne and 6 tonne.
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panch
Posted 28 Dec 2010
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Sorry Andy but i have just re-read the report and it does show that there is very little to be gained in increasing rolling potential any more than 1100kg/m (2650kg 1.2m wide twin drum) .Increasing rolling potential up to 2500kg(6000kg 1.2m twin drum) only increases compaction by 0.04kg/m3
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mackay
Posted 28 Dec 2010
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Weight of roller divded by width or drum 1 plus width of drum 2 = kg/m

so for 2650kg 1.2 twin drum it's 1104kg/m

for 6000kg 1.2 twin drum it's 2500kg/m

Not sure why you've then expressed this as a value for m3 since the amount of roller in contact with the ground differs depending on drum diameter and moisture content.

In the report there's a table demonstrating the % of proctor density achieved as the weight of the roller increases.

Earlier on in the report it also states:
'The heavier the roller, the greater the density increase that can be achieved - but the pitch has to be allowed to dry more.'

Is what is gained in terms of rolling potential significant when going from 2.6T to 6T significant in the context of a wicket? Well it will mean that once drying has occured, the end value for bulk density will be significantly higher.

All that said, cricket wickets in the UK rely on other things than simply squashing the soil, ie depth of rooting etc and so a 6T roller would probably be harmful to what we're trying to do, at least in the long run. Also, all squares are different.

Practically....... I've noticed a significant difference when using a 2.9T roller as opposed to a 2.2T one in our practice nets.
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A J
Posted 29 Dec 2010
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Andy, during psr or during pitch prep. Do you keep to the same width of roller? Only I've noticed some grounds have the narrower bomag road roller as well as the 4ft auto roller. Any reasons for this?

Cheers
Andy.
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mackay
Posted 29 Dec 2010
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No idea why anyone would do that, uless it is because one might have a lighter footprint than another.

We have a 1.2m wide Benford (or bomag, whatever) and a 4 ft wide autoroller. To all intents and purposes they are the same width but autoroller is lighter and has smaller drum diameter.
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A J
Posted 29 Dec 2010
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Ah' could have got it wrong, maybe they are the same width also? Just wondered as regard of any footprint change.
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nifty small
Posted 29 Dec 2010
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Hi Lads,just wondered if you could give us some directions regarding changing our roller.As i have previously stated in another thread we have been lucky enough to have been given a considerable amount of funds to spend on replacement roller , triple mower and pitch and square mower,Not enough for new gear sadly. Having read the replies on size,width, weight of rollers am a little confused which way to go now!!I I have always thought are current roller was too narrow and too light ,am afraid i dont know a great deal about it, apart from its a case vibromax 80,diametre of about 50",max weight 1,200kg.(30 odd years old at least).So we have funds to replace,what to look for regarding weight,drum diametre etc??The square i look after has 10 pitches by the way..Any help and guidence would be very much appreciated .
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Mike
Posted 29 Dec 2010 Last edited: 29 Dec 2010
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At the end of the day, Nifty, you are limited to what is out there, especially when dealing in the second hand market. Targeting the perfect, theoretical weight, footprint etc is all well and good, but if such a beast doesn't exist, or isn't available in the UK, you will have to run with what has been proven to work well.

For recreational cricket, there are numerous proven rollers that all do a fine job... Poweroll, Autoroller, Aveling Barford etc are used up and down the country with great results. I'd even go out on a limb to say that provided that you get the rest of the prep right (timing, duration, moisture content etc), you wouldn't be able to tell what roller was used for the prep, once play commences... i'd defy anyone to play on two different strips, side by side, and tell me which was rolled with a poweroll and which was rolled with an Aveling Barford, or any other similar class of roller.

I believe that far too much is made of the type of roller (in the recreational game), and not enough of the other aspects that pertain to rolling. Buy any of the above rollers, get your prep right, and you will get a decent wicket.
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trubs
Posted 29 Dec 2010
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Posts: 386

You could also need to spend the same again on security.
There have been a lot of break-ins all over the Country in the past few years, and is ongoing.
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nifty small
Posted 29 Dec 2010
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Posts: 71

Trubs,yes mate your right,we got hit 2 years ago,in the process of having a couple of those steel units delivered,not totally 100% (is anything!!!!!!!!!!) but better than what we have at present...........
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Minormorris64
Posted 30 Dec 2010
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Posts: 603

What goes around, comes around

Spot on from Mike A. in the IOM

'IF' you get the correct conditions, time your psr and other prep. correctly, I would also defy anyone in recreational cricket to tell the difference in what particular roller was used on a pitch.

BTW I use a Stothert & Pitt 32r, and have done since 1994.
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barry glynn
Posted 30 Dec 2010
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What do I do? I just cut the grass.

I wouldnt sway my Poweroller for that Aussie torture chamber for any amount of money. I get enough exercise thanks without humping something like that up and down
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mackay
Posted 30 Dec 2010
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No one can tell which roller has been used just by looking at a pitch, of course they can't. I reckon I could tell if one of my pitches was prepared with either the Autoroller of the Bomag, but not on anyone elses square.
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barry glynn
Posted 30 Dec 2010
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What do I do? I just cut the grass.

I meant swop not sway in my last post, must be an age thing, my fingers wont type what my brain is telling them to.
Is my tea ready Matron?
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barry glynn
Posted 30 Dec 2010
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What do I do? I just cut the grass.

And I m sitting here trying to input the fixtures into a next seasons fixture card cos I cant get rid of the Fix,Secs job.
I had two teams turn up for the same fixture on a Sunday last year and they still wont take the job away from me.
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seanmichaels
Posted 31 Dec 2010
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Barry, just don't book a midweek game to coincide with the horticultural society's monthly gathering like my old man did last year. They're a firey lot those flower lovers
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barry glynn
Posted 31 Dec 2010
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What do I do? I just cut the grass.

Yes Sean sounds familiar. I've had the reverse a few times, we had a hon. Sec who liked to hire the ground out in the summer to assorted bunches of boring lunatics like caravan clubs. Trouble was he never told me and I would turn up to cut the outfield having risked getting the sack by going to the funeral of yet another grandfather, only to find 100 boring pr•cks leaking diesel over my precious outfield. Or the local swimming club having their annual barbecue in the middle of the ground. Thankfully because of my natural rudeness, they don't happen anymore. Being a grumpy giant does have it's benefits .
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Cranfield
Posted 31 Dec 2010
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Posts: 236

Happy new year to all you Cricket Groundsmen, i have enjoyed reading the rolling thread, i will endeavour to get some editorial on the merits of rolling in a forthcoming magazine feature , it may be an opportunity to hear what the manufacturers have say about their rollers.

see you in the new year

Laurence
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Sumomosr
Posted 31 Dec 2010
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GOGGA

Loz, Yes,the 'Rolling Thread' was interesting until it deteriorated into yet another Faceblog full of Twatter Pratter and unsubtley asterixed foul language and I, for one, look forward to it being closed. Tweeting is for twerps!

Happy New Year to you though.
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barry glynn
Posted 31 Dec 2010
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What do I do? I just cut the grass.

Happy New Year to you too Sumo , would you like to borrow my grumpy old git tee shirt?
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