Welcome! Login | Register
Pitchcare Logo
Trimax ProCut S3
Browse over 11,000 Articles

Expected weather for this month:

Unsettled, with longer periods of rain. Snow expected on high ground, especially in the north. Strong winds likely later in the month.

The Met Office got November’s long term forecast horribly wrong and, apart from two or three days of cold and frost, temperatures were well above the average. In fact, storms were the order of the day, with Abigail and Barney (they now have names!) being the most damaging – leaf clearance and drainage issue would have been high on the agenda for many groundsmen.

When looking at forecasts beyond five days, the chaotic nature of the atmosphere starts to come into play - small events currently over the Atlantic can have potentially significant impacts on our weather in the UK in several days' time.

The Met Office forecast a generally unsettled weather pattern throughout December, with showers or longer periods of rain affecting many parts. Occasional sleet or snow is possible over high ground, and to lower levels at times, mainly in the north. The wettest and windiest weather is likely to occur across northern and north-western areas. Southern and south-eastern parts should be see more prolonged dry spells, however some rain or showers are still likely at times.

It will be windy at times with gales or severe gales possible, especially around coasts and hills in the north and west. Large day to day variations in temperature are likely with overnight frost during the quieter spells.

Key Tasks for December
Maintenance Regimes

Grass courts

  • grass growth will have slowed down, but certainly not stopped altogether, so you should continue to cut weekly, ensuring that you take no more than a third off in any one cut
  • a cylinder mower may still be used, but it is more likely that a rotary mower will serve you better
  • box clippings to avoid the spread of disease
  • remove leaves and other debris as soon as possible – a rotary mower does a good job

Artificial courts

Keep surface clean with regular sweeping and brushing

Remove any algae and moss from surface. Sand filled systems require regular brushing to maintain manufacturer’s recommendations on sand levels and pile heights

American Fast Dry courts

  • keep surface clean, rolling to consolidate surface
  • levelling and brushing of fast dry materials, brushing to clean lines

Clay courts

  • carry out regular sweeping and brushing to restore playing levels
  • topdress any hollows or damaged areas

Tarmacadam

  • carry out regular sweeping and brushing
  • repair any hollows or damaged areas

With many clubs allowing and, indeed encouraging, play on their artificial surfaces through the winters months (when weather conditions allow) it is imperative that these courts are completely free from moss, algae, leaves or anything else that might pose a slip hazard.

Remember – that the sun is at its lowest in December and daylight hours are at their shortest, so any shade problems you have will be exacerbated. These areas tend to take longer to warm up and dry out which, in turn, may affect maintenance operations and playability.

Agronomy

Soil sampling is an important part of Groundsmanship. The results will enable the manager to have a better understanding of the current status of his soil and turf. There are many tests that can be undertaken, but usually the main tests to consider are:

Particle Size Distribution (PSD); this will give you accurate information on the soil type and its particle make up, enabling you to match up with appropriate top dressing materials and ensuring you are able to maintain a consistent hydraulic conductivity (drainage rate) of your soil profile.

Soil pH; it is important to keep the soil at a pH of 5.5 to 6.5, a suitable level for most grass plants.

Organic matter content; it is important to keep a balanced level of organic matter content in the soil profile.

Nutrient levels; keeping a balance of N P K nutrients within the soil profile is essential for healthy plant growth.

Once you have this information, you will be in a better position to plan your season's feeding and maintenance programmes.

Weeds, Pests & Diseases

Earthworms may be a problem, so regular dragbrushing will be necessary. Brushing can be daily when conditions are right. Regular aeration to keep the surface open will aid drying. A drier surface may help towards reducing the effects of the earthworm activity near the surface. Diseases have been widely reported, particularly Fusarium. These outbreaks have been mainly due to the heavy dews and changing climatic air temperatures we have recently experienced.

The three disease factors: susceptible grass/host, pathogen, and environment, provide the evidence for disease diagnosis. Symptoms are the expression of the susceptible grass to the disease and can take on a variety of forms.

Symptoms may appear on the leaves as small, circular, tan-coloured lesions surrounded by brown or purple borders (leaf spotting); as yellow, red, or tan blotches over most or all of the leaf blade (blighting); stunting; wilting; or as a brown or black rot on the crowns and roots. The appearance of these symptoms will also vary depending on the type of disease, the severity of the attack and the developing stage of the disease.

The typical types of diseases you may come across are:

  • Fusarium
  • Red Thread
  • Dollar Spot

Please note: More information on these and many others can be found here: https://www.pitchcare.com/useful/diseases.php

Machinery & Materials

With some machines not currently being used, take the time to carry out an overhaul or send them away for a service.

  • inspect and clean machinery before putting away for the winter
  • replace worn and damaged parts as necessary
  • empty fuel tanks as petrol will go stale over winter
  • maintain a stock of consumables for your machinery
  • secure machinery nightly with good storage facilities and strong locks
  • record makes and models and take pictures of your equipment as additional reference
  • don’t leave it to the last minute when servicing dealers will be very busy
Training

Pitchcare provide a range of courses suitable for tennis clubs. In most cases, the courses can be held on site using the club's own equipment and machinery.

Some of the courses available are:

  • Chainsaws - CS30 and CS31
  • H&S Refresher Training on Combined Turf Care Equipment; Tractors and Trailers; All Mowers (Ride-on and Pedestrian)
  • Machinery Courses on ATVs; Tractors: Brushcutters/Strimmers; Mowers (ride-on and Pedestrian)
  • Pesticide Application (PA courses)
  • Stem Injection of Invasive Species (Japanese Knotweed etc.)
  • Basic Trees Survey and Inspection

More details about all the courses can be found here, or you can email Chris Johnson for information.

Other Key Tasks

Other Key Tasks

  • repair and maintain fence lines
  • cut back any hedges and trees and prune shrubs
  • take down and store all tennis equipment, ensuring that it is clean and dry before doing so
  • repair/update equipment as necessary

Articles you may find helpful

https://www.pitchcare.com/magazine/refurbishing-existing-surfaces.html

https://www.pitchcare.com/magazine/synthetic-tennis-courts-dealing-with-migration.html

https://www.pitchcare.com/magazine/busy-time-at-the-priory.html

https://www.pitchcare.com/magazine/walmer-tennis-club-racquet-mallet-and-renovation.html

https://www.pitchcare.com/magazine/hard-surface-tennis-courts-take-them-seriously.html

https://www.pitchcare.com/magazine/a-game-to-love-but-is-grass-losing-it.html

    Like this diary?

    Share & Support the Turfcare Industry.

    Back to All Diaries