0 Recycled Glass Could Help Struggling Golfers

Recycled glass could help struggling golfers

By Anne Wilson

The Sports Turf Research Institute found that replacing traditional sand on the golf course with sand derived from recycled glass improves the chances of those unfortunates drawn to the bunker.

The two-year project found that the recycled glass sand provides a better performance level with a firmer footing underneath. For golfers, it means less plugging of the ball, a steeper angle of repose and reduced slumping, WRAP said.

Laboratory tests carried out during the trial showed that the recycled glass conformed to all necessary performance requirements, it said, and is capable of complying with United States Golf Association specifications. WRAP said the glass-sand also proves beneficial for greenkeepers when used as a top dressing around divots, as it can blend into the ground better than traditional sand.

Andy Dawe, WRAP's materials sector manager for glass, said : "The trial undertaken by the STRI has been very successful, confirming that recycled glass derived sand is a quality alternative to traditional sand.

"At the same time, it offers greenkeepers a sustainable, quality product as well as a way to demonstrate their environmental awareness and responsibility," he added.

WRAP - the Waste and Resources Action Programme - has targets to directly facilitate the recycling of an additional 150,000 tonnes of glass into higher value markets by 2006.

For further details contact:

Anne Wilson
Head of External Affairs
STRI
St Ives Estate
Bingley
West Yorkshire
BD16 1AUTel: 01274 565131
E-Mail: anne.wilson@stri.co.uk
www.stri.co.uk

WRAP
Andy Dawe
The Old Academy
21 Horse Fair
Banbury
Oxon
OX16 0AH
Tel: 01295 819900
www.wrap.org.uk

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